Posts Tagged ‘drainwater heat recovery’

Solar hot water in New York

May 12, 2010

Here’s a solar hot water (solar thermal) that GreenHomes recently installed.  On a chilly and cloudy day in upstate New York, it’s sitting inconspicously on the roof, cranking out the hot water for the homeowners.  With a 30% federal tax credit, these make sense in overcast New York.  And Washington state.  And in sunny California and sunnier Colorado.  Solar hot water is a great way to take a big bite out of the 15% of our total energy bills that we pay to heat water.  (And heat water that we generally let run down the drain–but drainwater heat recovery is another issue.)

GFX — Drainwater Heat Recovery

September 11, 2009
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, as much as 250 billion kWh worth of hot water is sent down the drain.  We pay to heat water, and then we pour it down the drain.  That’s not good.  Fortunately, a good percentage of the wasted energy is recoverable.  
GFX installed in the drain of a home pre-heated incoming cold water and lowers the energy needed to provide hot water for your home.

GFX installed in the drain of a home pre-heated incoming cold water and lowers the energy needed to provide hot water for your home.

 
Several manufactures make version of drain water heat recovery systems—and one class in particular seems best suited.  These are gravity film heat exchangers, or GFX.  Water flowing down a drain pipe tends to cling in thin a film to the sides (not fall down the middle as you might imagine.  We can take advantage this to “grab” the heat from the waste water and add it to incoming water.  The two streams are separated by two walls of copper, so your incoming water is not fouled by the outgoing water.  In the photo, you see an actual installation (from my basement!) of the GFX, with the cold water inlet in the blue box, and the preheated water outlet in the yellow box.

The savings you’ll see depend a lot on whether you use batches of water (like baths, dishwashers, clothes washers) or whether the water drains as you’re using it, as is the case with showers (these simultaneous uses deliver the best recovery).  Depending on how you use water, you could save between 20-40% on hot water costs with a GFX, all from a piece of equipment with no moving parts, that uses no electricity, and that should last 50 years.

The GFX system can be a good complement to high-efficiency water heaters and solar hot water systems.  There are some installations challenges in existing homes, and especially in home built “slab on grade”.   There are also a variety of installation considerations to optimize performance.  But for many homeowners–especially those who have teenagers with a proclivity for hour-long showers!–GFX can be an attractive option.

Thanks,
Mike


%d bloggers like this: