Posts Tagged ‘Resilience’

Bills on the Rise? Freezing, Overheating? Take a Clue from Survival on the High Seas

February 28, 2014

Nobody wants to hear about rising energy costs. For utility customers in New York, prices have going up this winter. Some of it was an accounting error, but increased demand for Natural Gas due to the swerving polar vortex helped.
Propane costs have gone up too, article from Kansas Cityreferences pricing as high as $5 a gallon. ship at seaAll of this reminds me of the days when crude oil prices were all over the proverbial road, never mind a little swerving polar vortex.
It’s not just about heating and cold winters. California is experiencing a lack of winter which sounds kind of nice coming from the Northeast. They are also seeing a drought and I’d expect a long hot summer which means an expensive cooling season ahead.
We can’t control fuel prices, but we can take control of our homes. There’s a great thing in being able to “weather the storm”. In our homes, that means comfort, but also peace of mind that we are protected from the elements. Integrating resilience, in our homes is as simple as insulating a home well and air sealing it properly. It is like preparing for a long voyage across the sea, and helps when weather or high fuel costs hit us broadside. Batten down the hatches!

Thanks,
Jason

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ivan_Aivazovsky_-_Ship_in_the_Stormy_Sea.jpg

Integrating Resilience & Energy Efficiency in Existing Homes

May 22, 2013

This was a topic at national conference recently and a very relevant one.   As we respond and react to the terrible tragedy in Oklahoma I urge you to consider what it means to you and your home. remains of homes

The “opportunity” to rebuild thinly veils the great loss that has occurred and my heart goes out to those in need.  Let us also take this “opportunity” to make those homes better and all of ours.

Our homes should be safe places and while some natural disasters cannot be avoided no matter the type of building, it is important to consider saftey first.  For those homes that survive events like this or Hurricane Sandy, the ability to weather the storm longer is, in my mind, the strongest argument for energy efficiency.

Properly sheltered from the elements, a well insulated and air sealed home lasts longer in the extreme heat or cold.  Energy efficient lighting and appliances and their reduced load are better suited for alternative power supplies such as battery back-up or generators.

Take this “opportunity” to help now, here are some resources, and help plan for the future too.

Thanks,

Jason


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