Posts Tagged ‘save energy’

Death, Taxes and Energy Bills!

May 11, 2012

The Alliance to Save Energy posted this graphic comparing some common costs for U.S. homeowners.

As Benjamin Franklin said in 1817 “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” seems to me energy bills should replace taxes.

I’m guessing things are more comfortable in your home than they were for Mr. Franklin and I’m certain you want to keep it that way.   But addressing energy efficiency issues in the home can keep you comfortable and Ben Franklin honest, and save you more than a few of those bills with his face on it.

Thanks,

Jason

Does Daylight Savings Time Save Energy?

November 5, 2011

Tonight (or Sunday morning at 2am if you happen to be up then) Daylight Saving Time ends, and we turn our clocks back an hour.  (I still have to repeat “Spring forward, fall back” to remember which way it goes.)

Ostensibly, we use DST to save energy.  Some will cite a U.S. DOE study that suggests DST saves 0.5% electricity.  As this Scientific American article says, though, the studies are decidedly mixed.  Some studies conclude that DST actually increases energy consumption, exactly the opposite of its intended affect.  Does anyone have a coin to toss so we can settle this?

We do know a few things, though.  Farmers tend not to like it because it messes with their schedule.  I surely do NOT like it in the Spring which I lose an hour of sleep.  On the other hand, it’s been a very busy couple of months, and I’m very much looking forward to the extra hour of sleep tomorrow morning.  I’ll probably dream of air-sealing during that time.  Ah, relaxation!

Sleep well!
Mike

Attic-before and after

November 16, 2010

Here’s are two illustrative shots of the benefits of insulating and air-sealing an attic–even in the case where there is already insulation there!

Infrared shot of an attic before air-sealing and reinsulating

Infrared shot of an attic before air-sealing and reinsulating. The yellow on the bottom half of the picture indicates warm air and heat escaping through leaks into the attic.

In the first picture, with R-30 fiberglass batts in place, we can see through the courtesy of an infrared camera that much heat is escaping–and the batts appear a bright yellow-orange.  This is because warm air is escaping through leaks into the attic, and passing right through the batts, just like when the wind blows the heat from around you body through a loose sweater on a windy winter day.  This effectively defeats much of the R-valuse of the batts, in this case robbing about 50% of their effectiveness.

Infrared shot of an attic before air-sealing and reinsulating. The yellow on the bottom half of the picture indicates warm air and heat escaping through leaks into the attic.

In this shot of the same attic the follow day, the blue color on the attic floor shows that air-sealing and adding additional cellulose insulation has greatly reduced the heat loss.

In the picture to the right, of the same attic the following day, we can see from the cool blue color on the attic “floor”, that the newly blown in cellulose–blown in after extensive airsealing, is doing a much better job keeping the heat in the house.

So don’t be fooled by existing insulation.  Poorly installed insulation doesn’t work well.  If you’re experiencing drafts, cold rooms, hot rooms, or wasting much on your energy bills (in either the summer or the winter), a good home energy assessment can help you pinpoint the fix.

Thanks,
Mike


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